Our 2 cents on podcasting

Welcome back to the Smooth Podcast! This episode is truly a special one because we are interviewed our own hosts! On this occasion, our newest co-host Ioannis interviews Martín Acuña and Daniela Perea. They have both been this show’s hosts for almost six months and they are eager to share what they have learned about the industry. Research and preparation are two key things you have to do before hopping on the call. We go through several more advice pieces that you sure don’t want to miss! Tune in now and listen to our two hosts share their thoughts! *Scroll down for further information*

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Our 2 cents on podcasting

About our Guest 

Martín Acuña 

Martín is a trained musical theatre performer and communications professional with a concentration in film production. 

Even though he wants to pursue a career as an actor on Broadway, his favorite thing is being an Assistant Director in the Theatre or Film Industry. He dived in as a podcaster within the industry with Backstage Talk in early 2020. He wants to bridge the gap between Broadway and the musical theatre industry in Colombia and shed light on those whose work isn’t always under the spotlight. He has had interviews with ensemble members, producers, stage managers, production managers, and more to come. Check it out on streaming platforms or Facebook and Instagram. 

He is currently working at Smooth Podcasting as their Social Media Manager and Writer. 

Daniela Perea

Daniela is a musician & sound engineer, born and raised in Cartagena, Colombia. A coastal city from the northern region of the country, famous for its colonial walled city center.

She found music as a way to express herself and then began singing and writing songs as a teenager; This is why Daniela then decided to go into music school professionally. She ultimately paired it with sound engineering. For the last ten years, she has been professionally recording, editing, designing, and mixing sound for short and feature films, regional Tv series, radio, advertisement, corporate branding, and podcasting. 

Right now, she is the Operations Manager at Smooth Podcasting.

Smooth Podcast_Martin and Daniela: Audio automatically transcribed by Sonix

Smooth Podcast_Martin and Daniela: this mp3 audio file was automatically transcribed by Sonix with the best speech-to-text algorithms. This transcript may contain errors.

Smooth Podcast Intro:
All the technical busywork required to produce a podcast can be a struggle, establishing trust with clients and increasing sales for your company with your own podcast is something you can do well. We interview the top podcasters in the industry to provide hacks and insights to help you start and scale your podcast. Welcome to the Smooth Podcast!

Ioannis Sintoris:
Welcome everybody to this new episode of the Smooth Podcast! Today we have two very special guests. We have Martín Acuña and then we have Daniela Perea. My name is Ioannis Sintoris, and I am the host today! I’m really excited for what is coming up, and I’m really looking forward to hear about these people because I know that you can learn a lot from. So without further ado, let’s start with the episode, and I want to ask Martín, what’s the biggest thing you have learned as a podcast host? Because I know that you, before you started being a host in this podcast, you had also you were in your own podcast, which is something that I’ll leave in the show notes, in the resources for someone to check out. So you have plenty of experience, and I mean, you can say a lot, a lot of these things on that. So what’s the biggest thing you’ve learned being a podcast host?

Martín Acuña:
Wow, this is a big question, honestly. I think that the biggest thing I’ve learned as a podcast host, it has to go to research. When you’re a host and you’re looking for guests, you have to go deep down into who that person is and why does it interests you to have a conversation with so, as a podcast host, my process of finding guests has been a very fun one. And it all goes to research, into literally stalking their social media profiles, and I don’t usually use the word stalking, but it is like an, like an FBI agent going behind a lead because you have to know literally everything about this person, this individual. And it also, by having a great piece of research, by doing a great research, you will find in this guest sort of a friend when you’re talking to. So you can mention a lot of things that happened, I don’t know, 10 years ago, 5 years ago, last week, and that creates trust and that creates bonding between the host and the guest. So what I’ve learned to do is research that would be my biggest answer, honestly.

Ioannis Sintoris:
Yeah, that’s true. And you are very good at it because if someone takes out your episodes, you know, your introduction is amazing. You know, I remember an episode we had a guest here at the show, and when you talked about her, what she’s done so far in her life, she was like, she was amazed. She said, I mean, what kind of research have you made? You know you were, you are really stalkers sometimes. But yeah, it all comes down to what you want to achieve. You have to know some info for the guests that you are having on the show. So yeah, what about you, Daniela? I bet you’ve learned a lot of things so far as a host, but I want you to think about one, talk to us about it.

Daniela Perea:
Well, I think that that the biggest thing, it’s preparation, like when you go into an interview and you’re not prepared, that’s the biggest thing I’ve learned. And that could turn real quick into your biggest mistake at the same time. Because if you go there and I don’t know, for example, like a quick hack here, learn the name of your guest. That’s super important. Sometimes, like, I don’t know, mid-interview you’re like, what was this person’s name? I don’t, I don’t remember, especially because names gives you closeness. When you’re interviewing someone and you say their name constantly, you’re reassuring that person that you know who that person is, and that also helps you to feel close to them. I think that closeness and being prepared are the two biggest things I’ve learned. I’d like to before my interviews, I like to spend at least 10 minutes talking to my guests and letting them know that I know them. I take the research, Martín is the one in charge of research people, I don’t really do that. But he sends me that and I take the research beforehand, I’ve at least it’s a courtesy to, especially if you’re interviewing podcast hosts, to listen at least two episodes, three episodes of their show. So you show prepared and you can, what I always do is like, I listen to some episodes at the beginning, like the first episodes they did, maybe in the first 5, then I go to the middle section and then I go to the end section. That way I can see progress and I can talk about that progress in the show. So I think research is really important, but you can complement that research with preparedness to go and prepare yourself and get to know your guests a lot, not with only that research, but learn about what they do. If you’re interviewing someone, I don’t know, maybe a doctor, you’ve got to know about what that doctor did and what they’ve learned, not only like their bio and what they show in social media, but research around them and being prepared and like man, the biggest thing that you have to learn it’s, yeah, learn their name. Their name is super important. Don’t you ever say the wrong name that, turns it, like the interview down in, like in just one second, because your guest is like, yeah, that’s not my name. And then, then it goes all that like downward. So learn the name, get into your research, to your interview prepared, and get to know them so you feel prepared too. It’s not about the guest, it’s about you getting into a mindset that you know this person well enough so you can interview them so that, that will be the thing that I’ll say that that’s my biggest lesson.

Ioannis Sintoris:
Imagine calling this person with another name, that’s a huge withdrawal to the emotional bank. A huge, I mean.

Martín Acuña:
Yeah.

Ioannis Sintoris:
Yeah, that should never happen. That just should never happen. But yeah, it’s very important. You know that, what you said that, before every interview, you have to chat with him like 5-10 minutes, make him, make the guest feel comfortable, you know, because this way he can open himself more or herself, it depends. And yeah, then the conversation will have a better flow. So, yeah, that’s a very, very, very important mention. So.

Martín Acuña:
I to add right there that.

Ioannis Sintoris:
Yeah.

Martín Acuña:
I got used to, every single time before I hit record, if the guest has either a name or a last name I have doubts on, I’m always like, hey, I’m sorry, I have one question, is your last name pronounced like this or like that? And it happened to me a lot of times, and usually when they know they have complicated last names, they usually are like, thank you for asking me, the pronunciation is this. For example, I once interviewed a friend of mine that his name is JJ Niemann and written like N I E M A double N, and everyone, I don’t know why, said it Neimann instead of me Niemann. And I was like, hey, is your last name Niemann? And he was like, you got it right, that’s great. And I was like, cool. And we laughed. And that episode was great. So asking before hitting record how either the name or the last name is pronounced, is just a great way to start building trust and that closeness Daniela was talking about.

Ioannis Sintoris:
It’s essential. It’s essential. Yeah, no, that’s true. So the next question that I have for you, Martín, is and I bet that you know a lot about it, since you have, you’re the host of another podcast that you are currently doing on your own is, what’s the biggest like obstacle you faced and the biggest mistake you made, which also made you understand something that you should improve on. I bet you have a lot of insights about that, and I really want to hear your answer to that one.

Martín Acuña:
Well, honestly, and like when we’ve done interviews with Dani, they always say our biggest mistake once was not hitting the record button. Thankfully, like, I thank the universe that has never happened to me. I always hit record and like, we make sure we do. So thankfully, I’ve never not hit the record button, but I think the biggest obstacle for me has been planning and organizing because having a podcast on your own is a huge deal. It’s a very huge deal. Like, you are in charge of writing, editing, scheduling, doing the tech part of the stuff, like I personally don’t know about the tech part, I just plug in my mic and hope it records well, now Daniela has helped me a lot with that tech part. So the biggest, I think, the biggest obstacle has been planning and there are days in which I just miss things of my own podcast. And for this podcast, for the Smooth Podcast, I think the biggest obstacle may be like picking someone’s brain for a specific thing, because since we do a lot of stuff, sometimes a lot of guests go to another branch of topics that, they are cool, they are great, they’re amazing. But maybe it’s not what we are thinking for our audience, so I think that would be it. I know, Dani, do you have any, any idea or it’s something you want to add there?

Daniela Perea:
Well, I think that the, I got to say this is my first time doing a podcast, so I’m not, I’ve been fortunate enough to have a team behind me, but in our interviews, and I can’t imagine how, because we handle so many podcasters and so many podcasts and we know that there’s a lot of technical busywork behind it, that I can’t imagine me doing everything like research, booking, writing bios, checking out if the calendar meetings are right, if they, if you’re available or not, reaching out to guests before, after, during the sessions, those kind of.

Ioannis Sintoris:
The show notes.

Daniela Perea:
Like show. Yeah, exactly, show notes, transcripts, all that goes like everything that goes into the production process of a podcast, it can be a lot of work and it’s not, it’s not like you can just start a podcast on your own. You can do it, Martín did it, but I think it’s really hard work if you want to do it like super right, and if you want to go all the way in. I see now podcasters as entrepreneurs, in a sense that like when you start a podcast, it’s like when you’re starting a startup company, like everything’s so new and so like, everything is so vulnerable and you’re learning around it and you want it to be perfect, but you got to be super conscious. I think the biggest obstacle is going into producing a podcast and into making a podcast thinking you’re going to be an instant success because that could bring you a lot of heartache and that can bring you a lot of like, you’re going to be disappointed at the end of the day. But if you think of a podcast, let’s put it in Ioannis work, you don’t take another client to be his, his or her trainer and tell them, like, hey, you’re going to have the greatest body tomorrow. The same thing happens with podcasting. It takes time, it takes work and it takes effort. And sometimes people go there thinking this. I don’t know. Like, this is a plastic surgeon. I’m going to try keeping like Ioannis’ terms here, and you’re going to have a six pack just because you go into a laser surgery and like two months later, you have a flat belly and and you’re disappointed because you didn’t know how to do the work and how to eat properly. The same thing happens with podcasting. If you come and into the podcasting world thinking that you’re going to have the perfect podcast, that in a month you’re going to be the best podcaster ever, it could happen because there’s people that that has that kind of luck and that has, you know, that kind of, that kind of podcasts and they’re instant success, but the mindset is you’ve got to put hard work in it to have a great podcast.

Ioannis Sintoris:
That’s true. That’s true. Yeah, that’s amazing advice because everyone thinks, everyone wants to build a successful podcast in a very short period of time. But the reality is that no, you have to put a lot of effort, a lot of time, a lot of like, you have to work for it, you have to truly work for it. So, yeah, and it requires a lot of busywork, which a lot of people are not like ready to do. So, yeah, listeners, if there’s some that you should learn from this episode, is that always, always engage with your guests before starting the episode and make sure, and make sure that you have hit the record button. Otherwise, all the progress will be lost and no one wants to start over again. So this was today’s episode. I really enjoyed it. I bet Martín and Daniela did as well. Right, guys?

Martín Acuña:
Yeah, I did.

Daniela Perea:
Yeah, totally.

Martín Acuña:
It was fun.

Ioannis Sintoris:
Yeah, I know. Yeah, and we have a lot more to come. Thank you guys for joining me today. It was a pleasure having you.

Martín Acuña:
Thank you for having us.

Daniela Perea:
Thank you.

Ioannis Sintoris:
If you want to reach out to us, dear listeners, and please do not hesitate to do that, just take the show notes and you’ll find a way in. See you in the next episode!

Smooth Podcast Outro:
Thanks for tuning in to the Smooth Podcast. Be sure to visit us at SmoothPodcasting.com and follow us on social media for resources, show notes, and all you want to know about podcasting.

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  • Key Take-Aways

    • Knowing your guest’s name and correct pronunciation will create closeness.
    • Research your guests as much as you can before
    • Podcast shows need a lot of commitment, that’s why you should get a team to help you.
    • Go into podcasting with an open mind, you are not going to be an instant success.
    •  
    •  
    • Resources
    • Connect and follow Martín on LinkedIn 
    • Listen to Martín’s show 
    • Follow the Smooth Podcast on Instagram 
    • Want to be featured in our podcast? Send us a message at martin@smoothpodcasting.com