Growing network through your guests with Cinnamon Denise

Cinnamon Denise also works in a podcast company! Even though they weren’t required to have a show, she adventured herself to start one. The Music Executive was born after several sessions of brainstorming with a colleague. Cinnamon quickly understood how much time was invested booking guests and make them feel connected. She also found that her guests could connect her to new people for her to bring on the show. Cinnamon reflects on two things she wants you to take away: podcasting needs organization and a show is a living thing that you nurture constantly. We laugh a lot in this conversation, but behind that, there are extremely valuable pieces of advice from Cinnamon. We hope you enjoy it! *Scroll down for further information*

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Growing network through your guests with Cinnamon Denise

About our Guest

Cinnamon Denise

Cinnamon Denise is a vocalist, bassoonist, songwriter, and producer who has a talent for engulfing listeners into her music. As a classically trained bassoonist, Cinnamon incorporates a unique style of playing into her performances.

She has toured the east coast of Spain; performed on Eurovision-Slovenian national television; recorded with Grammy-winning producers and engineers; and performed at some of Atlanta’s top venues, including The Velvet Note and Apache Café.  Selected in the top 10 from 100 applicants, she was a semifinalist in the 2015 Montreux Jazz Festival Jazz Voice Competition, presided by legendary artist Al Jarreau. 

 

Source

Smooth Podcast_Cinnamon Denise: Audio automatically transcribed by Sonix

Smooth Podcast_Cinnamon Denise: this mp3 audio file was automatically transcribed by Sonix with the best speech-to-text algorithms. This transcript may contain errors.

Smooth Podcast Intro:
All the technical busywork required to produce a podcast can be a struggle, establishing trust with clients and increasing sales for your company with your own podcast is something you can do well. We interview the top podcasters in the industry to provide hacks and insights to help you start and scale your podcast. Welcome to the Smooth Podcast!

Martín Acuña:
Our special guest today is Cinnamon Denise, she is an amazing vocalist, bassoonist, songwriter, and producer who has a talent for engulfing listeners into her music. She is a classically trained bassoonist and she incorporates a unique style of playing into her performances. She’s an alumna of the University of Miami Frost School of Music, where she studied media writing and production and received her master’s degree in music technology innovation from Berklee College of Music in Valencia, Spain campus. Cinnamon has toured the eastern coast of Spain, performed in Eurovision, a Slovenian television channel. She has recorded with Grammy-winning producers and engineers, and performed at some of Atlanta’s top venues, included the Velvet Note and Apache Cafe. Cinnamon, it is an honor having you on the show! Welcome!

Cinnamon Denise:
Thank you, Martín! How are you?

Martín Acuña:
Good. How are you?

Cinnamon Denise:
I’m wonderful. Thank you.

Daniela Perea:
What an amazing bio!

Cinnamon Denise:
Thank you, Daniela. How are you? Is good to see you too!

Daniela Perea:
Welcome to the show. We’re excited to have you here.

Cinnamon Denise:
Thank you.

Martín Acuña:
So, Cinnamon. Our first question for you is, why did you choose to start a podcast and how has it evolved through time?

Cinnamon Denise:
Yeah, I decided to start a podcast. Well, first and foremost, I work for a podcasting company and it’s not required for us to have a podcast, but it makes sense. And the other thing was, I’ve always really wanted a podcast that I’m like, I have no idea what to talk about, where to come and go from, and all that sort of stuff. But talking to one of my colleagues, we were brainstorming ideas for the show name, brainstorming ideas for the topics. And it was going to be called Make Money Making Music. And then she was like, no, I don’t like it. She’s like, what about The Music Executive? And I was like, that’s actually way better.

Daniela Perea:
Yeah!

Cinnamon Denise:
Yes.

Martín Acuña:
And more of your production background.

Cinnamon Denise:
Exactly. Exactly. So it just aligned a lot better. And the way it’s evolved, I mean, I, by no means I think I was going to be an overnight sensation or anything like that, but I did not realize just how much time and effort it really does take the guests sort of saying, as I’m sure you know, picks up most of the time and like really connecting with the guests and making sure they feel like, you know, what you’re doing is key. And so as far as how the show itself has evolved, I found that it’s not just music executives that I want to talk to. It’s also music journalist. It’s also music business lawyers. It’s also booking agents, all sorts of people involved in the music industry. And I realized that the options are endless. So Music Executive just kind of sets the tone, but it really means anybody who is kind of doing their thing in the music industry, regardless of what lane they’re in.

Daniela Perea:
I love that. I love that.

Martín Acuña:
And that is awesome.

Daniela Perea:
Yeah.

Martín Acuña:
Yeah, I love it. So you cover all the musical leg of the entertainment industry?

Cinnamon Denise:
Exactly.

Daniela Perea:
Yeah. I think it’s good to know that there are so many different ways to make a business out of music. It’s not just being a musician, there’s all these layers to it. That’s great. Thank you for doing it.

Cinnamon Denise:
Thank you. Yeah. And it’s one of those things to do that’s like you said, how it evolves over time. We’re like, wait a minute, I don’t really have to talk to record label executives. One, they’re really hard to get hold of. They’re like the hardest people to get a hold of. So I kind of screwed myself over with the show name there. Well, as you know, as you start to connect with guests, they connect you to another one. Eighty percent of the guests that I’ve had have connected me to another guest. So those warm leads make a big difference. And building your network in that way is very effective, I found.

Daniela Perea:
And in that sense, what has been like your number one way that you’ve learned that the podcast has helped you out with your career?

Cinnamon Denise:
Yeah, I say I know that I’m planting seeds and those seeds are still growing right now. If I can think of a very specific example, one guest hired me to do production on one of their EPs. So that’s just like a very tangible, I’m like, like return of investment type of example, right? But in other ways, my network has grown much faster than it would have just trying to connect with people on LinkedIn and sending messages. It’s grown a lot faster than it would have just trying to send DMs on Instagram. Because the thing that I found was the executives are on LinkedIn, the music artists are, and journalists are on Instagram, the authors are on Twitter and everyone else is somewhere floating in between those things, right? And so I felt like where everyone lives and people say, like, go where your audience is and I have to be on all those things, I think y’all find me on LinkedIn, but I have to be on all those things because every, all the people that I want to talk are in all those, in all those things.

Martín Acuña:
So you’re a social media octopus!

Cinnamon Denise:
Exactly, exactly, exactly. And then like some, I’ve had a couple of my TikTok influencers on the show, and so I have to be on TikTok, so it’s like, it’s, it’s a whole thing. Some people I found off YouTube, you know, and then you go to the about section and it’s actually kind of easy to find people, not going to lie, it’s getting them to respond, that’s the thing.

Martín Acuña:
Yeah, finding someone is the easy part, getting an answer from them, another ball.

Cinnamon Denise:
It’s another ballpark. Yeah. So.

Daniela Perea:
I think those are like that’s gold there, from Cinnamon, man. Hey, she’s getting tips here. And you guys, you got to take them. It’s like hey, you got to find these people in here, and these people in here, and these people in here. And hey, this is your research that you’re throwing. But I think this is great, Cinnamon. Martín, some experience like this, too?

Martín Acuña:
Actually, I do, like I found for my podcast, for Backstage Talk, I’ve had to do exactly the same. Like I found people on Twitter, I’ve found people on LinkedIn, I’ve found people on Instagram. And the funny thing is how social media works nowadays is, you just send a message, and going to hope on the universe, ask the universe ….

Daniela Perea:
All the Gods, ask them.

Martín Acuña:
Yeah. Yeah. Like basically do something for the Greek gods for them to answer. And if you’re lucky, you will get the agent, of the agent, of the agent, of that person.

Cinnamon Denise:
Right. It’s kind of fun because you because then actually if you end up talking to that person, right, you’ve met their agent, their agent, their agent, their agent, so that’s four more people you can interview.

Daniela Perea:
And your network grows exponentially super fast because of it.

Cinnamon Denise:
It does.

Martín Acuña:
And it’s four people you already have contact with. It’s not like out of the blue. Hey, I want you on my podcast.

Cinnamon Denise:
Exactly. So that’s good. I think too, one thing to keep in mind is that, Martín, you and I have something in common with our shows because they’re like slightly in the entertainment industry, slightly in the corporate world, right, so there is a crossover between, like you said, they’re going to be kind of all over the place. Whereas if you’re only looking for chief marketing officers, or COOs, they’re probably just LinkedIn and Twitter. So it’s important to just know where your audience lives. Like, I’m not looking for a COO of salesforce, like I’m not really looking for them. You know, that’s not really my goal. But it’s important to know where your audience lives and where they connect with people and where it’s normal for that to happen.

Martín Acuña:
Yeah, in that order of ideas. Cinnamon, what has been the biggest mistake you’ve made and the biggest lesson you’ve learned from podcasting? Like in all this crazy world we’re in, those two.

Cinnamon Denise:
Biggest mistake, probably thinking it wasn’t going to take as much time, like that’s been a mistake. Isn’t a mistake like really underestimating that in order to have a good show, you have to put in some work like you have to put in some time. It doesn’t just float out on its own. You don’t hope that someone listens to it, like get to promote it, you need to do all those things, so like, kind of naivete there. And the lesson I learned is if you can get a team and even a team consist of one other person, it’s still a team, it doesn’t matter. If you can get a team to help you because like I have a team now that does the audio and the writing, like I just book people and record the episodes. So if you can get a team to help you, it helps you focus on the important part of the podcast, on the actual content. So, yeah, and then mistake probably it wasn’t that bad. But the guy I said the guest name, like I said, literally the wrong name and I was just like, his name is John, and I was literally there calling him Adam. And he was like, yeah, he was like my name is John, and I was like I’m so sorry. I knew it, I knew his name was John but something in me wanted to call him Adam. And you guys know, like, for whatever reason the older you get, the easier it is to mess up people’s names.

Daniela Perea:
Oh my God. Yeah, it is true.

Cinnamon Denise:
And it’s very intentional. And it’s like to me, I was saying, John, like I was so sure I was saying John. But listening back to the audio, and I was definitely saying Adam.

Martín Acuña:
Oh my god.

Cinnamon Denise:
And so he is like he was a real sweetheart about it. But still, like I shouldn’t be saying the wrong name, you know what I’m saying? So to me, that wasn’t a big mistake, it was embarrassing, but I’ve had embarrassing moments on stage that are much worse, so.

Martín Acuña:
No, don’t worry. Every time I step on the stage, I fall on that stage. It’s my, I will call it blessing because I always end up laughing about it. But there hasn’t been one time that I’ve been on stage that my butt hasn’t kissed the floor. And it’s funny.

Cinnamon Denise:
Exactly. So, yeah, the good thing about podcasting is, well, unless you’re doing it live, it’s not live, right, so you can edit it out or you can redo it. But to me, I was like, I’m trying to connect with this person, like on a professional level, and I can’t even get his name right, like ok.

Daniela Perea:
But it’s not your fault he had an Adam face.

Cinnamon Denise:
He did! He totally did. I thought. Yeah, he totally had an Adam face, like.

Daniela Perea:
And I wanted to ask, what’s the biggest lesson you can give out to the people listening? Like, what is that that you say this is a hack that you need to think and really think about when you’re about to do a podcast?

Cinnamon Denise:
Yeah, I would say two things. One, make sure you’re organized like especially if you’re going to be working with other people. They can’t read your mind. They should not have to go searching for files. They should not have to go asking you what follows what. Like they shouldn’t have to open the file to know that it’s an audio file, right? So get organized first and foremost before you bring someone on. And two, know that it’s a living, breathing thing, right, the format does not need to be the same every time you can change the music if you have music and like for my show, like it’s a music podcast so like, I can’t have the same music every show.

Martín Acuña:
It would make sense, to be like changing the intro and the outro once in a while.

Cinnamon Denise:
Yeah, exactly. So it’s an evergreen piece of content and, at least to the best of your ability right, the guest may say like, oh you know, covid and then be five years from now, maybe there’s no covid or whatever, but for the most part it’s in evergreen content. So know that it’s a living, breathing thing and it requires effort every episode, like no brushoff, any episode. You never know what someone’s going to get from it and change up the flow of show from time and time again, because it just keeps things interesting.

Martín Acuña:
Now that you mention that being a music podcast, you change the music in the audio once in a while, what has been your experience in managing content and the content’s schedule, what has been your overall experience with it?

Cinnamon Denise:
But yeah, so I firmly believe that having a team, so I have someone that like tells me post this on Tuesday at three p.m. like I send her my insights on Instagram and she’s like, this is the time you post it, and this is, she doesn’t tell me what to say, she doesn’t like dictate that or by any means, but she’ll guide me. But I do know, like everything she does, I could do myself. But then the take away from me focusing on creating content. So, so that’s one way to approach it, but other ways to, to recognize like the podcast episode is a piece of pillar content. So you can take that and make a blog post, you can make graphics, you can make a YouTube video, you can make microvideo, you can make whatever, you can make a whole bunch of different things. And so, like, really optimize. If you do a podcast episode every week, you should have enough content, your episodes should have enough content in them that you promote it five to six days between episodes. So if I do the podcast on Tuesday, Wednesday through Sunday, maybe not on Sunday because it’s Sunday, but when it’s Sunday, I am promoting an episode and Monday we have like a day off content or whatever, and then Tuesday we’re back at it again. And another thing I found is I had that people actually like I’m not really a huge social media person, actually. I kind of am always I’m on it because the people I want to talk to are on it, and it’s like when you’re doing the episodes, like before we hop off, you know, mine, I’d love to do like an IG story of us like doing a boomerang or something like that so that your guest is like feels like you are highlighting them. You’re excited to get to know them and that people know what you’re doing because if you just do stuff and put it out, they don’t know that you’re coming out to do a podcast episode. So it’s the pre, the during and the after post.

Daniela Perea:
Totally

Martín Acuña:
Of what you just said. Yeah. Like that structure of building a relationship with your guest is so important and it’s part of the overall engagement. Like one of the best advice I’ve got on my podcasting experience has been try to make your guest feel as if you were together in the living room having a drink, and that will be magic on the episode. So what do you just said about that relationship creation with a guest, plus the podcast being a pillar content for the rest of your strategy and pulling out content from the episode, that is a great piece of advice and that is a hack for everyone that wants to start a podcast.

Daniela Perea:
And to throw it too.

Cinnamon Denise:
Yeah

Daniela Perea:
I think that.

Cinnamon Denise:
Yeah. And, you know, don’t give up. Keep going. Go ahead, Daniela. I’m sorry.

Daniela Perea:
No, no no. I think that’s right. I think that’s the best advice you can give anyone in any area in the world. Don’t give up because I think that if you do podcasting to, you know, to be immediately visible and out there and be famous like from the start. Yeah, I’m sorry to say that’s not going to happen. It takes time. It takes effort. It takes you having a team that helps and supports you to grow and to lead on your industry. It takes a lot from you, but you got to do it because you love it, and I think that’s what we get from you, Cinnamon. So thank you very much for being, you know, you’re awesome.

Cinnamon Denise:
Thank you. Yeah, I do you love it? It’s fun.

Martín Acuña:
Well, we’ll be sharing all the links to your podcast and a new website on this episode’s description and Cinnamon, thank you so much. Across the distance and these crazy times we’re living in, a big hug for you. Thank you so much for being on the Smooth Podcast!

Cinnamon Denise:
Thank you. Y’all have a good day.

Smooth Podcast Outro:
Thanks for tuning in to the Smooth Podcast. Be sure to visit us at SmoothPodcasting.com and follow us on social media for resources, show notes, and all you want to know about podcasting.

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  • Key Take-Aways 

    • Having a connection with your guest is key for a good recording session. 
    • Asking your guests for an introduction to new people is another way of growing the network. 
    • Depending on the type of guest you want to invite, you have to look for them across different social media platforms. 
    • Finding guests is easy, getting them to respond to the invitation is the hard part. 
    • It’s important to know where your audience lives, but it’s equally important to know where your guests are. 
    • A team can consist of one other person. 
    • This team will help you with tons of procedures and processes. 
    • Podcasting involves organizational skills. 
    • The episodes are the pillar content, everything else are additions that embellish the show. 

    Resources