Content creation with a podcast

Τhis week’s brand new episode hosts Casby Bias, and it’s full of podcast hacks everyone should know! In this intriguing discussion, Casby shares her feelings and the difficulties she faced at the beginning of her podcast journey creating her show, Adulting 101: The Podcast. She wholeheartedly explains how nerve-wracking recording and publishing an episode can be. Casby motivates listeners to overcome their fears and start their own podcast, so they can inspire others with their ideas and their unique experiences. She reveals the mistakes she made entering the podcast industry and unveils three top insights that made a huge difference in her’s show quality. Hang on Debra’s words and learn from one of the best podcasters out there! *Scroll down for further information*

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Content creation with a podcast

About our Guest – Casby Bias

Casby Bias is the host of the podcast Adulting 101: The Podcast, a show she created to support people having trouble figuring out how to handle adulthood, by sharing her and her guests’ personal experiences and stories.

She is a video producer, podcast producer, and writer. She’s also the Founder of See Bias Productions since October 2012, a company focused on creating, organizing, and editing live-action videos, animated shorts, and podcasts. In 2014, she graduated with a bachelor’s degree in Journalism from Marquette University, and later she received her Master’s degree in Television, Radio, and Film from Syracuse University.

Casby’s favorite motto is “It’s better to share your voice with the public rather than keeping it for yourself”.

Source

 

Smooth Podcast_Casby Bias: Audio automatically transcribed by Sonix

Smooth Podcast_Casby Bias: this mp3 audio file was automatically transcribed by Sonix with the best speech-to-text algorithms. This transcript may contain errors.

Smooth Podcast Intro:
All the technical busywork required to produce a podcast can be a struggle, establishing trust with clients and increasing sales for your company with your own podcast is something you can do well. We interview the top podcasters in the industry to provide hacks and insights to help you start and scale your podcast. Welcome to the Smooth Podcast!

Martín Acuña:
Hello, everyone. Welcome back to the Smooth Podcast! Like, I’m, I’m very nervous because I am so excited to have this amazing producer over. My guest today is Casby Bias. She is a video producer, podcast producer, and writer. She’s also the Founder of See Bias Productions, in which she creates videos, animated shorts, and podcasts. In 2014, she graduated with a bachelor’s degree in Journalism from Marquette University, and later she received her Master’s degree in Television, Radio, and Film from Syracuse University. Casby, I am really excited. Welcome to the Smooth Podcast!

Casby Bias:
Thank you very much for inviting me on, on your podcast. Definitely sounds like you’ve done research on me, on my background, too, yeah, got the years and everything, I’m like, oh my goodness, okay.

Martín Acuña:
Just a little bit. So Casby, as a producer, why do you think someone should start a podcast and how can or does this idea evolve over time?

Casby Bias:
Well, that’s a good question. I would say, I would say that someone if they wanted to start a podcast, they should do so, whether or not they want to market themselves or do anything as far as anything with storytelling. For me personally, I started my own podcast, I have a podcast currently right now called Adulting 101, and I started that podcast based of my personal connection to it. My younger brother, he recently graduated from grad school not too long ago, last year, in fact, and so around that period of time, I was working on another podcast that I was developing, but I thought to myself, well, I see that he’s going through a lot of different things, similar to what I was going through once I left grad school, so it was like finding a job, trying to find an apartment, dealing with parents, hi, hi mom, hi, hi Dad, on, on a podcast or I call my dad, papa, as, as well, so. But just dealing with those different types of things and I thought, well, you know what? It would be great to offer him a different platform that he can listen to, to learn more about life really after college and just that whole adulthood phase. So that’s when I had started my own podcast from that personal connection and I feel like once you have that personal connection and people feel that you are connected to that, then they’ll also be interested in learning and listening more to that particular podcast as well. So I would say that will be the main thing when it comes to developing a podcast. Just make sure that you have some sort of relevant personal story behind it and that you’re very passionate about the topic.

Martín Acuña:
Mmhmm. I agree with you. I do think that having this connection and like feeling not only represented but like feeling related to a podcast is so important, and it’s such an amazing platform for us to just like, process a lot of things, and I think that that idea about adulting and going into adulthood is amazing. So you’ve been behind the mic and in front of the mic, you’ve had, that, both experiences.

Casby Bias:
Yes, that is correct, yes. It’s nerve-wracking sometimes because I’m like, oh my goodness, people are going to see me. So, but I have gotten a lot more comfortable over, over a period of time. Like I would consider myself a multimedia producer, so I’ve not only developed podcasts but also developed, like different live-action videos and animated videos, and evolved in different projects here and there on the side. And I recently picked up on developing different TikToks as well, so I promote, like, my podcast, podcast recordings, or episodes on there, as well as my different videos, and one of the assignments that I wanted to do, was to put myself out there more in front of the camera. So I’ve been doing that along with my animated character that I like to throw in here and there in different TikTok videos, and like I said, it’s been nerve-wracking, I was like, oh my gosh, people are going to see me, heck, but it’s definitely improved, as far as me getting comfortable in front of the camera.

Martín Acuña:
Yeah, totally, totally. It’s very nerve-wracking, but over time you get a little bit comfortable with it and you start dealing with nerves in another way instead of just like the old advice of thinking everyone is in underwear.

Casby Bias:
Right. Right. Yes.

Martín Acuña:
So you’ve had the experience with clients and with yourself, so what is the number one way you think a podcast has helped your clients’ businesses, or your business as a producer, or your business as a brand, yourself as a brand.

Casby Bias:
Yeah, I feel like it’s helped. So my current podcast is focused on just adulthood in general, so I feel like that’s helped those young professionals who have just recently left school or who have been out of school for a couple of years. I have also gotten feedback though, that it’s also helped other individuals who have been adults for quite a little bit longer than that. I remember one person reached out to me to say like, h hey, I heard your episode on mental health and staying off social media, where the episode I recorded, I was talking about how like, oh, well, when I left school, I was trying so hard to stay off of social media because every single time I looked, everybody had a job and I didn’t. So.

Martín Acuña:
It can take a toll.

Casby Bias:
Right, exactly, exactly. And so I was like, man, I felt so jealous, and so the person reached out to me is like, I felt the exact same way, even during the times when I didn’t immediately leave school and I saw people and I was in-between positions. I was like, wow, that’s really awesome to hear other people’s feedback and stories just to tell me that they’ve also felt the same experiences. So I really developed these episodes to help people out there, whether they have recently left school or who have been out of school for quite a little bit, just as overall adults to help them further develop into that adulthood aspect and let them know like, hey, we’ve all had similar experiences, and if there are any tips or advice that you’re looking for on this particular topic, whether it is looking for an apartment or, I recently put out an episode on salary negotiation with J.T. O’Donnell, the CEO and founder of Work It Daily, and she’s awesome, just to help people as far as just learning about different things that they can use for the future and future conversations or different things like that. And I guess for me, as far as how it’s helped me, I would say it’s helped me as far as my, my overall brand. So back in 2014, I was thinking about what exactly I wanted to do, and I wanted a way to express myself in a professional, in professional manner, but also still be able to tell my own personal stories as well. So I feel like with my podcast through telling different experiences that I’ve been through, whether it’s interviewing other people or whether it’s me telling people experiences that I’ve previously had through my diary experiences, haven’t done that for a season, two, but who knows if I get enough requests, think about it for season three. But it’s just a platform in a way for me to further develop myself, develop my voice, and let people know like, Hey, I’m an adult, I do adult things, and that’s how I’m marketing myself to be. And so I really feel like people relate to that, and that’s what they come to me for, just getting that adulting advice or information and really coming to me as well on that marketing aspect. I consider myself an innovator, so just to be able to talk to individuals, whether it is through podcasting or different multimedia platforms, they’re able to see different ways in which I like to promote myself to the public, and I feel like this podcast is definitely helped and has been just another avenue for people to actually see that and comes to me if they need similar or different types of advice.

Martín Acuña:
I love it and I agree with you. For me, podcasting also has been a way of sharing my own experiences and talking to people that may have similar or completely different experiences from me, and just like picking advice from parts, I love it and I love how it has helped you and your brand specifically. What has been, and I’m curious about this because you’ve had the experience both in front and behind the mic, what has been the biggest mistake you’ve made and the biggest lesson learned in podcasting?

Casby Bias:
Yeah. So biggest mistake I made would probably be to not have started sooner. I know in the beginning for me again, I, I noted earlier that I was pretty nervous as far as putting myself out there in front of the camera, but it really goes to show with anything as far as multimedia. I was, of course, nervous in the beginning, like starting my own first podcast, I don’t remember what year that was, but just starting out and getting that confidence to say like, oh OK, so you’re going to be displaying your voice to the world and listening back to it, man, my voice sounds weird, it’s like, what is this? Who is this speaking? Who is this individual? And so that took me some time to get used to as well, but I feel like it helps to just drop what you have and then just run. I feel like I do that a lot with my TikTok post that I put up recently. I feel a lot more comfortable with my podcast episodes nowadays, but just, it’s essential to drop whatever you have and just display it to the world. As I always say, like, it’s better to share your voice with others and with the, with the public, than to not share it as a fault at all.

Martín Acuña:
And I love that.

Casby Bias:
Right, exactly, because one thing I like to say, I, I just want to be heard, I just want to be known, to have my voice out there, and I feel like with the different platforms that I’ve used, I’ve been able to do so, so. And then one thing as far as just something that had helped me out as far as further development would have to be using presets within. So I use a program, I use Adobe Audition, specifically, and I know there are other platforms out there, but definitely using presets to help make you sound better and blocking out certain noise in the background, too, is definitely, definitely helpful and something that I wish I’d known in the beginning as well. You could tell from a couple of my early episodes, but hey, like mistakes happen or learning experiences, I would like to say.

Martín Acuña:
Yeah, absolutely.

Casby Bias:
Yes, yes. So that’s, that’s definitely helped me, and that’s something that I would have done if I had to go back, just to start sooner.

Martín Acuña:
And I love it. I want to, I want to go back to the greatest advice you just gave for our listeners about, it’s better to have your voice outside that, than keeping it to yourself. And I love that one.

Casby Bias:
Right.

Martín Acuña:
And you made me remember also my very first episodes, and it still happens to me because English is not my first language, is a second language, and sometimes it’s very funny when I’m re-listening or editing, and I’m like, why am I saying words so weirdly? And then it’s like, OK, no, take it easy on yourself.

Casby Bias:
Right.

Martín Acuña:
English, you learned English since you were little, but it’s not going to be perfect, you’re going to have your Latin accent or your weird pronunciation for certain words, And, and it’s so funny. I like, right now, I just laugh at myself.

Casby Bias:
Yes. Yes. I mean, that’s all you can do at some point in time.

Martín Acuña:
Exactly.

Casby Bias:
I mean, kudos to you as far as just learning, learning different languages in general. I know for me, I’ve, I’ve learned Mandarin, I am not an expert, but I’ve learned a little bit of Mandarin here and there, and it’s definitely been difficult.

Martín Acuña:
Quite a challenge, yeah.

Casby Bias:
Yes, it’s quite a challenge as far, as like learning the different strokes and just speaking it correctly and how the way you say a word could actually mean something completely different, like you could say mother or like, you’re trying to say mother, but you’re really saying horse, and so it’s just this. Kudos to you, kidos to you!

Martín Acuña:
Yeah, it’s going to happen.

Casby Bias:
And also, also just add from the earlier point, just I feel like sharing your story with the world and not being afraid to do so, that’s also essential, too, because you never know what other people have been going through it, either. As I mentioned earlier, like just me putting my story out there to the public and the one person who came up to me and told me his story and just other experiences too where, you know, how like, for example, you’re in a meeting, I worked in corporate for a certain period of time, and there were times where I was like, man, I really have this question, but I’m afraid to ask this, I feel like I should know absolutely everything. And so it turns out, yeah, people have the same exact questions, and they’re just waiting for other people to ask them too, so I’m like, yeah, I have the exact same thing, yeah, X, Y, and Z. So yeah, it’s, it’s just that, that would definitely be something I recommend, to not be afraid and to just put yourself out there and put your content and story out there.

Martín Acuña:
Yeah, yeah. And sharing your story as true as you can be to yourself, and that’s important. And this has been amazing. You’ve given us so much advice. You’ve also given us two hacks, one audition and the presets, obviously.

Casby Bias:
Yes, please use them. Oh my goodness!

Martín Acuña:
Discover them, play with them, and find the one that fits you best. And two, sharing your story and not keeping that to yourself. But before we close, Casby, do you have any other hack or something you think people really should know about starting or growing a podcast? This can be a tip to help grow audience, ease operations, grow leads if you’re monetizing, whatever comes to your mind.

Casby Bias:
Hmm, that is a good question. I would say just reaching out to audiences that you currently have if you aren’t able to think of different guests that, or a new guest that could be on your show. One of the essential crowds that I reached out to as I was beginning and trying to get comfortable with everything was reaching out to my existing audience members, specifically Linkedin. It’s a very professional platform, so just to be able to reach out to other individuals that way and axing around as far as topics that you may want to talk to the more people about, is definitely a helping factor as far as further developing your episodes and seeing what other experts are out there.

Martín Acuña:
I love it. I love it. Casby this has been amazing. Listeners, please go and binge-listen to Adulting 101.

Casby Bias:
Yes, Adulting 101: The Podcast, yes.

Martín Acuña:
The Podcast. Trust me, you are not going to regret it. Casby, thank you so much for coming over, thank you so much for your advice, and I cannot wait for what’s to come your way, both on the mic and behind the mic.

Casby Bias:
Yes. Well, thank you so much, Martín. I really, really appreciate it, and I really, like I said, I’m really happy to be on your podcast and wish you more than success as far as your podcast and launch for, for the future, even though I know you’ve launched already, again, words.

Martín Acuña:
Thank you!

Smooth Podcast Outro:
Thanks for tuning in to the Smooth Podcast. Be sure to visit us at SmoothPodcasting.com and follow us on social media for resources, shownotes, and all you want to know about podcasting.

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  • Key Take-Aways

    • There are no mistakes, only learning experiences.
    • Make sure your podcast is based on a personal experience that is related to the topic.
    • Being enthusiastic about the idea of your podcast and the content of its episodes can attract more listeners.
    • You might feel a little nervous and worried about recording a podcast episode at first.
    • You’ll need to figure out how to ease yourself into feeling more comfortable in front of the camera.
    • It’s reassuring to hear from others who have had similar situations.
    • Your podcast should serve as an inspiration to those who can relate to and be inspired by it.
    • You could eventually regret not getting started sooner by delaying establishing your own podcast.
    • It’s preferable to share your voice with others than to keep it to yourself as a flaw.
    • Using programs to help you sound better and filter out background noise is quite beneficial.
    • Stress prevents us from performing a series of things and accomplishing our goals.
    • Start reaching out to audiences that are already available to you, such as social media, friends, work.
    •  
    • Resources
    • Connect and follow Casby on LinkedIn 
    • Listen to Casby’s podcast Adulting 101: The Podcast on Apple Podcasts  
    • Find Casby’s company See Bias Productions on Facebook 
    • Learn more about Adobe Production, the program that Casby uses to improve her sound quality
    • Follow the Smooth Podcast on Instagram 
    • Want to be featured in our podcast? Send us a message at martin@smoothpodcasting.com