Consistency is the key.

All the way from the software industry comes Bob McAdam to give his best advice on podcasting! Bob has been a podcast host for the last seven years and he never imagined he would be in podcasting for that long. The Enterprise Software Podcast started after Bob and Todd, a friend of his, were having conversations about their industry. His show has evolved from having two hosts to have three hosts. He also does emphasizes the importance of being consistent when creating a show. Bob’s experience through the years is vast, and he reiterates that consistency has been the key to his success. *Scroll down for further information*

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Consistency is the key.

About our Guest – Bob McAdam

Bob McAdam is the co-host of Enterprise Software Podcast as well as Vice President of Strategic Partnerships at Michigan-based SalesPad, the distribution software leader for Microsoft Dynamics GP and Microsoft Dynamics 365 Business Central. 

Bob is a 23+ year veteran of the Microsoft Dynamics ecosystem, having spent time as a partner, customer, and community leader (overseeing the Dynamics GP User Group (GPUG) as its General Manager). Born and raised in western New York, Bob earned his undergraduate & graduate degrees ‘up north’ before permanently relocating to the Tampa Bay area where he has been ever since.

 

Smooth Podcast_Bob McAdam: Audio automatically transcribed by Sonix

Smooth Podcast_Bob McAdam: this mp3 audio file was automatically transcribed by Sonix with the best speech-to-text algorithms. This transcript may contain errors.

Smooth Podcast Intro:
All the technical busywork required to produce a podcast can be a struggle, establishing trust with clients and increasing sales for your company with your own podcast is something you can do well. We interview the top podcasters in the industry to provide hacks and insights to help you start and scale your podcast. Welcome to the Smooth Podcast!

Martín Acuña :
Hello, everyone! Welcome back to the Smooth Podcast. Today’s guest is Bob McAdam. He is the co-host and co-founder of the Enterprise Software Podcast. He is, as well, the vice president of Strategic Partnership at Michigan-based SalesPad, the distribution software leader for Microsoft Dynamics GP and Microsoft Dynamics 365 Business Central. Bob is a 23+ year veteran on the Microsoft Dynamics ecosystem. Having spent time as a partner, customer, and community leader overseeing the dynamics GP user group as its general manager. Also, Bob was born and raised in western New York, but he earned his undergraduate and graduate degrees up north before permanently relocating to the Tampa Bay area, where he has been ever since. Bob, welcome to the Smooth Podcast!

Bob McAdam:
Thank you, Martin! I appreciate that introduction. It was very nice, a lot there, but yeah, I’ve been busy working a long time and enjoying my time in the Microsoft space. So thank you for the invite today. It’s great to be here!

Martín Acuña :
Well, thank you for accepting. It’s an honor. I want to begin this conversation with you, asking you why did you choose to start a podcast? Tell me how it all started?

Bob McAdam:
So Enterprise Software Podcast is a product of myself, as well as my two industry colleagues, Todd McDaniel and Darcy Boerio. They, too, live here in the Tampa Bay area on the west coast of Florida, where, by the way, the weather is much nicer than where I grew up, but that aside.

Martín Acuña :
Yeah.

Bob McAdam:
Originally it was Todd and me that started it. We’ve worked in the same business, we had the same employer for a short period of time, maybe fifteen years ago, and Todd is a regular podcast lister on a variety, or listener on a variety of topics. And I would go visit his office periodically and we would talk to one another about what’s going on in our industry. This person moved over to this company or this company acquired another competing firm. We just would shoot the breeze about what we’re doing in our business and what’s going on. And one day he said to me, you know what? We should do a podcast. And I thought to myself, you’ve got to be kidding me! Who was going to listen to what we have to say when we’re just shooting the breeze here in your office? But he’s like, no, there’s a niche for everything, and everybody in the Microsoft Dynamics world and other competing ecosystems is already blogging, right? You can learn a lot by reading a blog about functionality in accounting software, especially if it has screenshots. So a lot of people, a lot of our peers are blogging about what they’ve learned and solutions they’ve come up with. But no one was doing a podcast seven years ago, it was May 2014, seven years ago this month that Todd and I launched the first Enterprise software Podcast and had a slightly different name, but it’s the same website and the same two guys. So yeah, his idea was to draw traffic to his website, my website, get us more notoriety in the space. Everybody’s blogging, so why not do a podcast? Why not give people something they can download to their mobile device and listen to on their commute or maybe on the weekends or on the treadmill or whatever? So we decided to give it a try. The cost to get in was pretty low. We both had the time to do it. And next thing you know, we’ve been doing this now for seven years. If you had told me seven years ago that I’d still be, I would told you you were crazy, Martin. But I guess I’m the crazy one because we’re still doing this. So it kind of got started on a whim. There was no master, grandiose plan, honestly. It was on a whim. And we just enjoyed it. And I’ve learned a lot, and so it does Todd and so does Darcy. And it’s been tons of fun. And people ask about it and they sponsor once in a while. So we keep going. It’s a good time.

Martín Acuña :
That’s cool! Well, I mean, seven years ago, boom when the dynamite! And seven years after here you are, with your well-positioned podcast, in an industry that you thought that weren’t going to be much listeners on. Well, it has and it has grown a lot. How has that podcast idea evolved through time?

Bob McAdam:
Well, it’s a good question. So Darcy was a guest in the first year and she lives nearby and she has been not in the Microsoft space as much as Todd and me, but a lot of time in the Sage software space. Sage is a big UK-based software developer. So Todd wanted to expand our programming, saying there’s a lot going on in Microsoft Dynamics, but not enough for we can do this, say, twice a month. So let’s expand and let’s see if we can get into other ecosystems as well. So if it’s a slow news day in the Microsoft world, maybe someone else is having a busy news day.

Martín Acuña :
Yeah.

Bob McAdam:
So the Sage space is a pretty familiar one here in North America as well as Europe. So we asked Darcy after she appeared as a guest if she wanted to come on as well, and Darcy’s very well connected. She’s in marketing and channel management and she knows her craft well and she was excited about trying something new. So we added her at the beginning of 2015, changed our music a little bit, change the original title of the show to what it is now today, Enterprise Software Podcast at EnterpriseSoftwarePodcast.com. And the three of us have been doing it ever since and we’ve tried to expand beyond Microsoft and Sage periodically to talk to other people that maybe worked in those spaces but don’t any more, or we’ve just gotten to learn through our partner connections. So that’s how it’s evolved. At the beginning, we didn’t do any monetization. Now we try and sell a little advertising now that we have our legs underneath us and some notoriety in our space.

Martín Acuña :
Well, that’s very cool. I was going to ask you about that. How has that experience with monetization been with your podcast?

Bob McAdam:
I would say it’s been pretty good. It’s hard to monetize sometimes, right, the podcast is available for free. It’s in the iTunes store. You can get it over RSS and those links are available on our homepage. Periodically we sell home page banners and we sell specific episode page banners or we read blurbs on the air when we introduce the news or an interview segment. What we’ve tried not to do is tell the person who is being interviewed that it’s a requirement that their company sponsors, that’s, we don’t want to do a pay-for-play. We’d rather have an advocate of theirs or maybe a customer of theirs sponsor instead. So they get maybe a plug during the time that the interview was conducted. So monetizing it is challenging. We have a decent amount of listeners, but we’re not like Joe Rogan, right? So either we have a pretty niche space, we’re talking about very specific areas. So periodically we will get a sponsor. It’s not very expensive. Somewhere between three and five hundred US dollars, home page advertising goes for like two grand a year. Todd’s company is a sponsor. I have a new gig that I just took in February, so I’ll be going to ask them in a few weeks once I get some more time on the payroll for a sponsorship. And we’ve had developer sponsors on the homepage as well. It’s not easy. You’ve got to go out and sell. You’ve got to collect. You’ve got to put the banner on the page. You’ve got to figure out what you’re going to say about these folks that they want. So monetizing isn’t easy, but as long as we cover our costs and we do a little roadshow here and there, if we get invited, that’s all we’re looking for. We’re not looking to get rich on this. We’re looking for notoriety, we’re looking for traffic to our website. It’s a marketing tool as much as anything. So not going to get rich on being in podcasting, not yet, anyway.

Martín Acuña :
Not yet. So you’d say that the number one way that the podcast does help you in the business or your business partners is as a marketing tool?

Bob McAdam:
Yeah, yeah, I think so, because, again, everybody is blogging and we’re advertising industry news and we’re talking to the people that make the industry go, many of them are friends of ours. Sometimes we meet someone new that we’ve never spoken to before that we want to talk to. But yeah, it’s been a lot of fun and it was something different. A lot of podcasts have since come up in the Microsoft space. I don’t know about the Sage space as much, I’m a Microsoft guy. But a lot have come up since we did one. And it’s flattering to be copied in that way because again, back in 2014, no one else was talking about what’s going on in the news. But everybody’s talking about what’s going on, and current events, and merger and acquisition activity, and Microsoft in the news all the time for what they’re doing with Azure and Dynamics 365 and Microsoft 365. So there’s really a lot to talk about just in that space alone, and periodically we get to get into other ecosystems as well that we learn about and talk about and invite people to talk to us and help us learn at the same time.

Martín Acuña :
Yeah, I’m curious about what has been the biggest mistake and the biggest lesson you’ve learned in podcasting in these seven years, because it’s been a lot of time.

Bob McAdam:
Yeah, well, if I was to go through every mistake that we made, I’d be here forever. We are hardly perfect pontificating podcasters, that I can assure you we make plenty of mistakes and we learn a lot. But, you know, the one thing I have learned, Martin, is that if you’re going to do a podcast, you decide, you and your friends, your colleagues are going to do a podcast, you better stick to it, right? Consistency is your friend, right? There’s been plenty of people that have tried a podcast, they want to get a specific niche in our space because they see us doing it all the time and they get a few in and then they get busy or they can’t find an interview subject. And the next thing you know, it falls off the map. And the one thing that we have tried to hold ourselves to is trying to do about 20 episodes a year. So two per month, except maybe December and January, when you have Christmas and you have the new year, it’s harder to get people when they’re coming back to work. So if we could do 20 a year or two per month on average and have a couple of months where we slack off and try and figure out what we’re going to do differently for next year, that to me is the biggest lesson. You got to be, consistent right? Buying the equipment or finding the online storage or recording capabilities, that stuff’s not hard, right, the microphones and the recording mechanism and all that sort of thing. It’s the commitment, are you willing to do this in your spare time, particularly if you have another gig during the day? And Darcy and I have really pushed hard to do that. Todd’s business is growing of late, so he hasn’t had as much time to do this as we do. But she and I are committed to it. And we say to each other, hey, we’ve got to get another one in, the calendar’s rolling up, and it’s going to be May next week. We’ve got an interview set up for tomorrow. So we’ll have something in the first half of May and then we’ll chase somebody down and get ready for the second half of me. So consistency is your friend with podcasting, I’m sure you and Daniela know that, and if you’re going to make a commitment to do something like this, you better be ready to show up on a consistent basis one way or the other. And that way you’ll keep going, it’ll become habitual and you’ll be a podcasting professional.

Martín Acuña :
Absolutely!

Bob McAdam:
Or something like that.

Martín Acuña :
Yeah, yeah. One of the of the last questions would be what is your number one podcast hack or something you think people really should know about starting or growing a podcast, besides that great advice you just gave about consistency and commitment.

Bob McAdam:
OK, so when Todd and I started, we had this pretty simple recorder. It wasn’t anything fancy. And it produces two files, right? It holds four microphones and it produces two separate files. And those files have to be edited, right? If you want to edit stuff out, you’ve got to clean them out, and then you’ve got to merge them into one so people can download one file. So we started doing that ourselves at the beginning and figured out, man, that’s a lot of work. So we went out to Fiverr, Fiverr.com, and found a guy in Vegas who doesn’t charge too much money, but he has all the professional equipment, he takes the files, cleans out all the dead air, adds a few sound effects here and there between segments for us, and sent it back with one file that we can upload to EnterpriseSoftwarePodcast.com. So if you’re not technically savvy around audio and/or video files as far as trimming out edits and making sure everything syncs together, find somebody who is because there are a lot of people with the proper equipment that could make your life easier because they’re good at it. And if you stick with them, as long as we stuck with this guy, you’ll get a good price and you’ll get consistent work. We don’t even have a schedule. We do a podcast, we clean it up, send it to him, and he looks for it even when he’s on vacation, and we get it back in a couple of days if that. So be prepared for the technical activities that are required for podcasting. And if you are not ready or you’re not willing to do that sort of thing because it is time-consuming, find someone who is and you’re you’ll be much happier. I promise you.

Martín Acuña :
I absolutely agree with you. Well, listeners, you’ve got amazing advice today from Bob. First, it requires time. Podcasting requires time. You need to be consistent. Second, it is a commitment. And third, get yourself a team that knows how to edit all the technical stuff that maybe you don’t need to know, but you can get support from them to share your genius with the world. Bob, thank you so much for being with us today. We will be linking and giving all the shortcuts and links to the Enterprise Software Podcast, you all know, EnterpriseSoftwarePodcast.com. You can find it there. Bob, it’s been a pleasure. Thank you so much for being with us today!

Bob McAdam:
Well, thank you, Martin. I appreciate the invite. And when I’m down there in Colombia one of these days, I’ll be sure to track you down!

Martín Acuña :
Oh, please do!

Bob McAdam:
Thanks again.

Smooth Podcast Outro:
Thanks for tuning in to the Smooth Podcast. Be sure to visit us at SmoothPodcasting.com and follow us on social media for resources, show notes, and all you want to know about podcasting.

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  • Key Take-Aways 

    • Monetization comes once you are a bit known in the market. 
    • Podcasting is all about consistency. 
    • Most podcasters do their show in their spare time while working day-time gigs. 
    • After some time, committing to a show will become habitual. 
    • Get yourself a team that can help you work on the show!

    Resources