Activism through podcasting with Anne Therese Gennari.

Τhis week’s brand new episode features Anne Therese Gennari, the host of the “Hey Change” podcast! In this fascinating discussion, Debra shares what motivated her to launch her own show and the progress she’s made since the beginning. She states that she really enjoys being a podcast host and getting to know more people. Anne Therese also reveals the hurdles she faced but also ways she figured to overcome these challenges and enhance her podcast growth. Finally, she refers to some new tools that were recently added to her show and provides some helpful insights that level up her podcast. Join the episode and learn more about using a podcast to promote your business! *Scroll down for further information*

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Activism through podcasting with Anne Therese Gennari.

Anne Therese is the host of the “Hey Change” podcast, a show she created to empower people to be the change they wish to see in the world.

She is a speaker, educator, and environmental activist. She’s also the co-founder of the world’s first ethical modeling agency, Role Models Management, and the online activist community, The Climate Optimist. Her podcast, Hey Change, aims to inspire listeners to embrace curiosity and positivity, as well as promote an ethical and sustainable way of life. As a coach, she helps shift the narrative around climate conversations so that everyone can act from curiosity and courage instead of fear.

Source: 

Smooth Podcast_ Anne Therese: Audio automatically transcribed by Sonix

Smooth Podcast_ Anne Therese: this mp3 audio file was automatically transcribed by Sonix with the best speech-to-text algorithms. This transcript may contain errors.

Smooth Podcast Intro:
All the technical busywork required to produce a podcast can be a struggle. Establishing trust with clients and increasing sales for your company with your own podcast is something you can do well. We interview the top podcasters in the industry to provide hacks and insights to help you start and scale your podcast. Welcome to the Smooth Podcast!

Martín Acuña:
Hello, everyone. Welcome back to the Smooth Podcast. Today’s guest is and Anne Therese Gennari. She is a speaker, educator, and environmental activist. She is the co-founder of the ethical modeling agency Role Models Management, the online activist community, The Collective, and the podcast Hey Change. Her podcast aims to inspire listeners to embrace curiosity and positivity, as well as promote an ethical and sustainable way of life. As a coach, she helps shift the narrative around climate conversations so that we can act from curiosity and courage instead of fear. Anne Therese, it is an honor to have you. I know Dani and I are very happy to have you, so welcome to the Smooth Podcast!

Anne Therese Gennari:
Thank you so much. I’m so excited to be here.

Martín Acuña:
First, why did you choose to start a podcast, like having already your agency and having this online activist community, why did you decide to start a podcast?

Anne Therese Gennari:
Well, first of all, actually, the podcast started kind of before all that. And,

Martín Acuña:
Oh, really?

Anne Therese Gennari:
Yeah, so it just came from this deeper wanting to continue having conversations. I kept meeting really inspiring people and having the most, like life-changing conversations, and, you know, I kept thinking to myself, I wish I could share this with someone because this is, you know, more people need to hear about this, and it was people from, sustainable activists to entrepreneurs to business owners, and they all have very cool ideas, and I just, I like talking and I thought I can talk live and start a podcast and I listen to some podcasts and podcasts have been a big part of my own journey and something I would keep tuning into and finding inspiration and kind of stay on my path and my own journey. So yeah, that is, kind of was just, like this crazy idea I had, and I think I signed up to, like a start a podcast in a 100 days challenge, and so I gave myself the challenge, and I told myself at the end of this, I’m going to do a podcasting launch party in Soho, Manhattan. And so I made this big thing and a big vision, and I remember finding myself at this party with all my friends and I’m like, what am I doing? Like, I’m just promoting my own podcast, which is like, literally just born out of my own computer. But it was cool and this ongoing journey since that is just four years ago now in May.

Martín Acuña:
Well, that’s very cool but I need a, just out of curiosity, I need to step a little bit and know how that idea evolved in that 100-day challenge to launch a podcast. Tell us a little bit about that.

Anne Therese Gennari:
Well, I started strategizing what kind of guests I wanted to have on there, you know, like, how often would I release an episode, and I learned everything there was to learn about editing, or at least what I thought I needed to know to start and all the like, details of, you know, the technical issues and stuff like that, the nitty-gritty work, and the frustrating journey that took me down because, you guys are podcast hosts, there’s so much work that goes into editing and you learn from your mistakes. But, but yeah, I think for me, having an idea I, I’m a doer by nature. So if I have an idea, I’m like, no, there’s nothing to lose, I’m just going to go ahead and do this, and I needed to have a very audacious goal at the end of it, like being the launch party because I knew if I had a goal, like I would make it happen, but I actually remember the early days before it was even launched, I attended a really cool event for sustainability with H&M in Stockholm and this, the keynote speaker that opened the event, I’m like, oh, you’re talking about the future and this is so cool, so I walked up to him and I’m like, I have a podcast, can I interview you? So like, I started to really just reach out and onboard these cool people before I had nothing to show. So looking back, I, I was a little bit bossy, but I’m grateful that I was.

Martín Acuña:
And one thing that I can feel coming out of this is in that whole uncertainty of starting a podcast because the three of us have been there at some point, we’ve had to embrace imperfection a little bit because, I mean, we are perfectionists but I think that one of the biggest lessons in life has been embracing imperfection and like patting ourselves on the back when something is not the best quality or is something that we know it could be improved, but it’s like, hey, don’t worry, you’ll do better next time, right?

Anne Therese Gennari:
Yeah, I relate so much to the imperfection part. I’m a perfectionist, so that was a scary challenge for me to kind of put something out into the world that I knew wasn’t perfect but, you know, and you reach a point where you’re like, OK, you can’t keep editing this episode, like you spent hours on it already and as you go about this, you can listen to it again and then for the next episode, like, OK, now, now I’ll learn how to do that better, maybe I should think about this next time. And, you know, I’m going to be honest, there are times when people come to me now and they’re like, oh, I listened to your first episode, I’m like, you mean the first episode four years ago? And they’re like, yeah, it was so good, and I’m like, I get so nervous knowing that those still exist and that people actually do tune into them, like sometimes I’m like, should I just take them down? I’m like, well, there’s still value there. So I think my lesson in this is like, it’s bigger than you and you have to kind of take yourself out of it, you know. People are not tuning in to find all the errors into like, oh, you missed this little editing right there like, they’re there to listen to your message and to the people talking and I think that’s been a humbling journey for me to kind of just be like, OK, just step out of yourself, show up for the bigger mission and, you know, speak from your heart and whatever you put out, it’s good enough and you can always improve. So, yeah, perfection, though it’s, it’s hard.

Daniela Perea:
Well, I’m actually a sound engineer, that’s my profession. So I know what you mean because now that, that I’m the host, I’ve always been like, behind the scenes, and now that I’m the host, when I’m editing the episodes, I need to send someone else at the team because I have this urge to re-record things, like sometimes I don’t know, I say a word that I think to myself, that’s not the way you say that word. I’ll need to re-record that.

Anne Therese Gennari:
I’ve been there too and like, I think all of us can say, like English may not be the first language. I mean, at least not for me, I’m Swedish. So that was also a big hurdle to come, come over and still, like, I get nervous speaking on recorded, like being recorded and knowing that, you know, someone’s going to listen to this. Sometimes I just don’t find the words, although I know the word and it took me many people telling me like, well, you do speak a second language. So like, to start there, right, like, if you were recording this in Swedish, no one would understand what you were saying. So like, just, just be yourself and don’t worry too much about it and if you make up on word of it of some kind, that’s fine, like people still understand the bigger message. So yeah, but I totally relate with that, like I’ve been wanting to re-record myself so many times and I have done that sometimes, too. So I’ve been there.

Daniela Perea:
Yeah, I love that phrase in Modern Family, where Sofia Vergara says, like, you don’t know how intelligent I am in Spanish.

Anne Therese Gennari:
Yes.

Martín Acuña:
Yeah.

Anne Therese Gennari:
I just start saying that like, just listen to me in Swedish, you would know.

Martín Acuña:
And what is the number one way this podcast over four years, through the whole four years, has helped you and your business and your brand as an activist?

Anne Therese Gennari:
Honestly, I recently reflected on this because I now realize how much of the connections I now have in my life has come through my podcast and just in a very organic way, people finding my podcast somehow, you know, have reached out to me from listening to one of my interviews. So it’s honestly for me, it’s just like a networking tool. It’s a way to connect with people, and, you know, I’m always amazed by the, you know, the fact that people are listening and someone would send me an email like, oh, I heard your podcast or your podcast was listed, you know, on one of the sustainability podcasts to listen to, and so I love your work and I’m like, wait, you listed me? It’s just like, you still think used to exist in this vacuum, you put something out there and no one’s going to listen to it, but people do, apparently, and it’s always, you know, super rewarding to know. And yeah, I think I owe a lot of just the connections that have come through and now, like, you know, many of the models that we were presented with the agency have come through, like people finding my podcast and clients that we work with there and sometimes I’ve interviewed someone who became a client. So it’s just, it’s really like for me, when I started the podcast, it was actually the same time that I started putting together the idea of the, of the agency as well, and I had to kind of have the conversation with myself of, you know, you need to prioritize. So whatever you’re doing now, then need to make sense together because everything you’re, you know, taking on is asking for a lot of time and commitment. So it was from early on I knew that the podcast would be beneficial for my personal brand, but also for it, for my business.

Daniela Perea:
Yeah, and, and like in regards of all the process that you did to have your podcast, what’s the biggest mistake that looking back, you can say like, oh my god, I really screwed up and here, and what was the lesson, like the biggest lesson you learned from that?

Anne Therese Gennari:
I don’t know if I have like, wow, I really screwed up moment, maybe some of my listeners will have to tell me that. But I would say that, I mean, I’ve tried to quit podcasting many times, I need to be honest here. I’m like, this is it, I’m done, like, I can’t do this anymore. I think too early I was, I was too committed. And I’m like, I’m going to have one episode per week and I’m going to keep doing this, and it’s just, it was too overwhelming and too much work. Also not monetizing it early enough where it felt rewarding. I would also say, like in conversations with people like, I can fully being there and letting go of everything else and not focusing so much of like, what’s the next question, and I be so like, really tuning in to listening. I think that’s something that’s evolved over time, but that was hard to begin because you want to make sure you ask the right questions and to follow up. So you’re almost like, focusing more on yourself and your own questions over the person you’re interviewing. So those are a few things. And one thing I’ve learned, maybe now that this is kind of the tip I wouldn’t give people, but I learned that you can record separate audio files on the Zoom, which is game changing. And so,

Martín Acuña:
For us too, don’t worry.

Anne Therese Gennari:
For anyone who’s starting a podcast or want to start a podcast this is like, the first thing I would make sure to like, write down anywhere is, well, two things, actually. Now I have a big mistake that I did once, last year. One thing is to make sure that you save the audio file separately, which means if you’re talking and the other person, you know, there’s a screaming baby in the background, which is, you know, #COVID, you can edit that out. So it’s not an issue that there’s, you know, stuff happening in the other line, they’re separate files, which is so helpful because if it’s just one file you can’t edit that out, so it’s just everything is one. Secondly, don’t forget to record, that did happen to me one time last year, and I’d been trying to get this guest on my podcast for so long, it’s the head of marketing at this bank. And after some like, shit, I didn’t record this. I was so upset with myself and I’m like, what do I do now? And obviously I had to tell them, like it didn’t record. So can we do it again? So I would say that was, that’s my biggest mistake I’ve done, not recording the conversation.

Daniela Perea:
I love little white lies in there, like when, when I don’t record, it’s like, you know what, I was listening to the audio and it sounded weird. I do want to re-record this because it’s, it’s not going to be usable.

Anne Therese Gennari:
Yeah, it’s like white lies. But then I’m like, do they see through this? I don’t know. Yes, but I, I get it.

Martín Acuña:
We hope we don’t.

Anne Therese Gennari:
Well, now, now it’s all in the air, so now you can’t say the lie anymore. I’m sorry. People know about it.

Daniela Perea:
Yeah, I know. Fortunately, I, I do have a reminder. And now that you have this message in Zoom saying that you’re recording, it’s like you’re recording.

Anne Therese Gennari:
Very helpful, actually. Thank you, Zoom.

Daniela Perea:
And about early in this answer, when you were saying about not monetizing soon enough, what has been your experience with monetization? How like, say, like, I think it’s time to do this and how are you doing that?

Anne Therese Gennari:
Well, I thought to myself many times, I need to monetize this. I was just, I mean also, I guess because my podcast is about sustainability and changing the world and so selling stuff didn’t feel right, so I wanted to feel authentic but then I brought on a co-host for my last season, and Robin is my co-host, she is amazing, and I told her, I’m like, I think we should monetize. Also because I wanted to be able to pay her for being on the podcast, so it was actually bringing someone else in, and she’s like, of course we need to. So she became like, she’s in charge of that, I’m so grateful for her but we actually just kind of made a list of brands that we wanted to promote so that we can actually can be like, picky and choose and she put together a beautiful, you know, pitch deck of like, here are the guests for the season, here are some things we’re going to talk about, and then we sent it out to brands and we got a lot of people saying yes. So it was cool because like, they got to choose like, I want to promote this episode about ocean plastics or whatever it might be. So we found a way to do it our way. It’s not streamlined, but at least we feel authentic, putting stuff that we believe in and it’s not just consumerism in general. So yeah, but it took me until this year, and I’ve been doing it for over four years to actually find a way to monetize it.

Martín Acuña:
But it’s been a great experience.

Anne Therese Gennari:
Yeah, and I’ve learned a lot, and, you know, it’s, I think something to if someone’s tuning in and just starting a podcast and I mean, I think there’s a lot of self-doubt and imposter syndrome of like, is this good enough? Is this worth, you know, paying money for? And, and again, like it’s not about creating the most beautiful show. Don’t compare yourself to like, the BBC podcast or, you know, all those amazing, like they have a full-time editor sitting there like, you know this, Daniela, because she used to say I come from this world, I’m not that person and I do the best I can but like, it’s the message that people are paying for, it’s not the, the editing quality or like how hype the show sounds like, so, I would say, just like, try it, like I was, I try monetizing earlier than, sooner rather than later because you will get run dry and not be able to continue because it takes a lot of time. So yeah, I would say dare to ask for money and find the people that you want to advertise in your podcast. Also know that, I think podcasting, correct me if I’m wrong, but like it’s on like, one of the top best way to promote a brand. So like, they know that it’s true value to be, you know, sponsoring a podcast episode. So know that too.

Martín Acuña:
Yeah, I absolutely agree with you. I know that podcasting is one of the best ways to not only promote a brand, but also create a company culture and that, that part is amazing. And before we go, our last question for you is, drumroll, please, what is the number one podcast hack? Because you already gave us one, the Zoom recording different audio files, but what is the number one podcast hack or is something you think people really should know when starting a podcast? This could be either a tip for growing audience or ease operations, grow leads, finding sponsors? What do you think is, like right now, one no brainer thing?

Anne Therese Gennari:
See, I knew about this question, and my answer was going to be about recording separate files, but I already gave that, so I need to give something else. I would say that’s my number one because it is game changing and such an easy thing to do. I would say like, something that I’ve had to teach myself, and this may not be the hack, but just kind of mindset tool, try having fun doing this, create a ceremony around the editing part because it’s what’s going to drive you nuts if you don’t. So I try to like, do it. I actually love mornings, so I would sit outside now in the summertime with my computer, a cup of coffee and like, OK, I’m editing and like, it feels like this magical time for myself, and it’s really fun when I do it that way. But I usually do, I start editing like a first draft and then I go for a walk and I’ll listen to it and I take notes as I’m walking and then if I have to go back to a second round of editing, so don’t over edit it before you listen to it, but also give yourself a first shot of editing and then listen to because you will might be like, oh, this is crap, because you haven’t gone through the first editing phase first. So it usually takes two to three rounds of editing, in my opinion, before it’s like perfect. But try creating a ceremony around editing part so that it’s actually fun and like having a system, I would say, so like maybe every Friday morning or whatever it is, that’s when you edit your podcast and be ahead of your schedule. So you’re not like, sitting there last minute, you know, the night before it’s supposed to go live. I’ve been there and it’s stressful.

Martín Acuña:
I love it.

Daniela Perea:
Yeah. I think that, that the scheduling is the best thing ever. If you want to not stress through the process of having a podcast, you need to be super organized with your methods and how everything is developed and how you get to that point because, yeah, I think that applies to life, like do it, whatever you want, but the night before, that’s not the way to do it. You’re going to get stressed.

Anne Therese Gennari:
Yeah.

Martín Acuña:
Anne, it’s been amazing having you over. Everyone, go check, Hey Change, this is Anne Therese’s podcast. We will leave her details and all the links for you to listen and get involved with her agency and the online activist community in the description. And thank you so much for coming over!

Anne Therese Gennari:
Thank you so much for having me. It’s been a lot of fun.

Smooth Podcast Intro:
Thanks for tuning in to the Smooth Podcast. Be sure to visit us at SmoothPodcasting.com and follow us on social media for resources, show notes, and all you want to know about podcasting.

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  • Key Take-Aways

    • Push yourself to overcome challenges and put yourself in unpleasant circumstances in order to achieve great goals.
    • You have to embrace the imperfection sometimes because you’ll find new ways to make it better next time.
    • Podcasting is a networking tool for meeting people and establishing new connections.
    • You have to prioritize the conversation with your guest rather than stressing about the next question.
    • Save the audio file separately in order to eliminate annoying background noises and keep your recording clear.
    • Consider having another person helping you with monetization, as it may be time-consuming.
    • Podcasting is one of the best ways to promote a brand, but also a company culture.
    • Don’t be afraid to approach someone about becoming a sponsor of your show.
    • Avoiding last-minute efforts by scheduling and editing your podcast episodes ahead of time.